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Art History Faculty

TCU's student-faculty ratio of 15:1 allows you to work closely with professors committed to teaching excellence and active scholarship in their fields of expertise.

Babette Bohn (Professor) is a specialist in Italian art, with a Ph.D from Columbia University, an M.A. from Boston University, and a B.A. from Northwestern University.  She has published widely on Bolognese prints, drawings, and paintings of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, including Ludovico Carracci and the Art of Drawing (2004).  Other publications have focused on the women artists of Bologna and on the portrayal of Old Testament and Apocryphal heroines in Italian art.  In 2008, she prepared an exhibition for the Uffizi Gallery, Florence on Guido Reni’s drawings, for which she also wrote the catalogue.  She is currently co-curating an exhibition on the Italian painter and draftsman Federico Barocci that will open at the St. Louis Art Museum in October 2012, and travel to the National Gallery London in February 2013. She also co-authored the catalogue of this monographic exhibition of paintings and drawings. Dr. Bohn has received both the Dean’s Teaching Award and the College of Fine Arts’ Teaching Award.  She teaches courses on European Renaissance and Baroque art, Women and the Visual Arts, the History of the Print, and Drawing as Artistic Invention. She has received grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, and the Villa I Tatti, the Harvard University Institute for Italian Renaissance Studies.
Curriculum Vitae
Contact via email: b.bohn@tcu.edu

Frances Colpitt is the Deedie Potter Rose Chair of Art History. A specialist in contemporary art, theory and criticism, she holds a B.F.A. (Painting) and a M.A. (Humanities) from the University of Tulsa, and a Ph.D. (Art History) from the University of Southern California. Dr. Colpitt has taught at the University of Texas at San Antonio; Cornell University; the University of California, Santa Barbara; and the University of Southern California. Some of her recent graduate seminar topics include Theories of Beholding: Optical Formalism to Relational Aesthetics; Color: History, Theory, and Sensibility; Conceptual and Postconceptual Art; Photography In/As/Not as Art; and The Future of the Avant-Garde. Professor Colpitt's scholarly publications include Minimal Art: The Critical Perspective (University of Washington Press), Abstract Art in the Late Twentieth Century (Cambridge University Press), and Vernon Fisher (University of Texas Press). She is currently writing a book about the critical relevance of abstraction for the postmodern period. A corresponding editor for Art in America, she is the author of numerous essays on art since 1970 for exhibition catalogues published by museums and galleries throughout the U.S. Dr. Colpitt has organized many exhibitions, including Material Culture, Skin Freak, and Color Pictures for Fort Worth Contemporary Arts at TCU.
Curriculum Vitae
Contact via email: f.colpitt@tcu.edu

Lori Boornazian Diel (Associate Professor) received her Ph.D. in Latin American Studies from Tulane University and a B.A. in Art History and Anthropology from Emory University. A specialist in the pre- and post-conquest art of the Aztecs, Dr. Diel’s book, The Tira de Tepechpan: Negotiating Place under Aztec and Spanish Rule, was published by the University of Texas Press.  She has also written articles on representations of women in Aztec art; these have been published in journals such as Ancient Mesoamerica and Res: Journal of Anthropology and Aesthetics.  Supported by a grant through the Wenner-Gren Anthropological Foundation, her research on the Manuscript of a Dogging has been published in Ethnohistory and Arqueología Mexicana.  She was recently a Summer Fellow at the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, in support of a new project on the Codex Mexicanus, an Aztec pictorial manuscript created after the conquest.  She teaches a variety of courses focused on the art of the ancient Americas, such as Art of Mesoamerica, Art of Ancient South America, Maya Art and Architecture, and Art of Mexico from 1500 to the present.
Curriculum Vitae
Contact via email: l.diel@tcu.edu

freund

Amy Freund (Assistant Professor) received her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, and her A.B. in Art History from Princeton University.  Prof. Freund is a specialist in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century French art. Her research and teaching interests include politics and visual culture, portraiture and selfhood, the history of the art market, and artists’ materials and working methods.  Her first book, Portraiture and Politics in Revolutionary France, 1789-1804 (forthcoming, Penn State University Press), examines the ways in which sitters and artists used portraiture to reformulate personal and political identity during the French Revolution. Articles related to this project have been published in Eighteenth-Century Studies, The Art Bulletin, and in Interior Portraiture and Masculine Identity in France, 1789–1914 (Ashgate, 2010).  She is currently working on a second book on the representation of the hunt in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century France. Dr. Freund’s research has been supported by the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the National Sporting Library, and the Kress Foundation.  She teaches courses in early modern and modern European art, as well as the History of Photography.
Curriculum Vitae
Contact via email: a.freund@tcu.edu

sullivan

Scott A. Sullivan (Professor and Dean) holds a BA from John Carroll University, and an MA and Ph.D. from The Joint Program in Art History at the Cleveland Museum of Art and Case Western Reserve University.  He is a specialist in 17th century Flemish and Dutch art.  His book The Dutch Gamepiece was published in 1984 and articles have appeared in The Art Bulletin, Oud Holland, and elsewhere.  He frequently and consults with museums and private collectors on attributions.  Dr. Sullivan's research has been supported by grants from the American Philosophical Society, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.   He currently serves as Dean of the College of Fine Arts and thus his teaching is limited to special problems and individual studies.
Contact via email: s.sullivan@tcu.edu

Mark Thistlethwaite (Professor) holds the Kay and Velma Kimbell Chair of Art History. Having earned degrees in art history from the University of California at Santa Barbara (B.A. and M.A.) and University of Pennsylvania (Ph.D), he specializes in the art of the United States, while also teaching courses in contemporary art, modern and postmodern architecture, and the history of graphic design. As a teacher, he has received TCU's Chancellor's Award for Distinguished Teaching, the Honors Program's "Professor of the Year" Award, and a Mortar Board "Preferred Prof." As a scholar, he has published books and articles on nineteenth century and contemporary art, particularly on the subject of history painting. Dr. Thistlethwaite has chaired the City of Fort Worth’s Art Commission and currently serves on the Board of Trustees of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, the Board of Trustees of the African American Museum of Dallas, and the Visiting Committee of the Amon Carter Museum.
Curriculum Vitae
Contact via email: m.thistlethwaite@tcu.edu